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Moods Snapshot The Beauty of Plants

Ready for Spring

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Accidental Art Find of the day Snapshot The Beauty of Plants

Asymmetry

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Moods Snapshot The Beauty of Plants

Wintering

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Botany The Beauty of Plants Think Pink

Shapeshifter

On the island of Mainau, I learned today that the fruit of a magnolia tree can look like a flamingo.

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Moods Snapshot The Beauty of Plants

Gold rush

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Botany Moods Snapshot The Beauty of Plants

Fall Beauties

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Find of the day The Beauty of Plants

Asphalt Jungle

Sometimes the prettiest flowers grow in the most unlikely places

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Botany The Beauty of Plants Think Pink

Monday`s Blossoms

There’s always a rosy spot somewhere

 

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Botany The Beauty of Plants Thoughts

For Easter

Magnolias are astonishing. Such an abundance, every spring anew, fading away in the shortest time and leaving nothing but quite an unspectacular tree. However, magnolias have been the oldest known flowering plants, dating back millions of years, when there were no bees yet in existence but already butterflies fluttering around.

A symbol of the cycle of ephemerality and rebirth. Of resurrection and eternity.
Happy Easter.

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Moods The Beauty of Plants Thoughts

A Day in March

Even under a gloomy sky, there may be sunshine

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Joy of the Week Moods The Beauty of Plants

Hello, Spring

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Botany Find of the day Joy of the Week The Beauty of Plants

Dreaming of Spring

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Accidental Art The Beauty of Plants Writer's Life

Abstractions

Structures, parallels, symmetries and accidental patterns, found on Mainau Island today.

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Botany Snapshot The Beauty of Plants

All the Small and Beautiful Things

Impressions from yesterday’s hike in the Kleinwalsertal: all the poetry of small things.

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Botany Joy of the Week The Beauty of Plants

Made in China

Blooming again in town: Fortune´s Double Yellow and Weigela florida, discovered in China and brought to Europe by «my» nineteenth century botanist Robert Fortune.

Fortune’s Double Yellow

Weigela florida

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